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This is El Greco

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By Gwylym Owen

Doménikos Theotokópoulos (Greek: Δομήνικος Θεοτοκόπουλος [ðoˈminikos θeotoˈkopulos]; 1 October 1541 – 7 April 1614), most widely known as El Greco (“The Greek”), was a Greek painter, sculptor and architect of the Spanish Renaissance. “El Greco” was a nickname, a quotation to his Greek origin, and the artist normally signed his paintings like his full birth declare in Greek letters, Δομήνικος Θεοτοκόπουλος (Doménikos Theotokópoulos), often additive the word Κρής (Krēs), Cretan.

El Greco was born in the Kingdom of Candia (modern Crete), which was at that grow old part of the Republic of Venice, Italy, and the middle of Post-Byzantine art. He trained and became a master within that tradition before traveling at age 26 to Venice, as supplementary Greek artists had done. In 1570, he moved to Rome, where he opened a workshop and executed a series of works. During his stay in Italy, El Greco enriched his style as soon as elements of Mannerism and of the Venetian Renaissance taken from a number of great artists of the time, notably Tintoretto. In 1577, he moved to Toledo, Spain, where he lived and worked until his death. In Toledo, El Greco received several major commissions and produced his best-known paintings, such as View of Toledo and Opening of the Fifth Seal.

El Greco’s dramatic and expressionistic style was met similar to puzzlement by his contemporaries but found salutation by the 20th century. El Greco is regarded as a precursor of both Expressionism and Cubism, while his personality and works were a source of inspiration for poets and writers such as Rainer Maria Rilke and Nikos Kazantzakis. El Greco has been characterized by innovative scholars as an artist in view of that individual that he belongs to no adequate school. He is best known for tortuously elongated figures and often astounding or phantasmagorical pigmentation, marrying Byzantine traditions bearing in mind those of Western painting.

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