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23 facts about Master of Saint Giles

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By Gwylym Owen

The Master of Saint Giles (French: Maître de Saint-Gilles) was a Franco-Flemish painter active, probably in Paris, about 1500, working in a delicate Late Gothic manner, with rendering of textures and blithe and loyal depictions of actual interiors that be active his affinities as soon as Netherlandish painting. It is not sure whether the Master of Saint Giles was a French painter who trained in the Low Countries (perhaps more likely), or a Netherlander who emigrated to France.

His nom de plume was unmodified him by Max Friedländer, who reconstructed ration of the anonymous painter’s oeuvre, starting from two panels devoted to Saint Giles (a Miracle and a Mass) in the National Gallery, London, that were allowance of the lefthand shutter of an altarpiece, and two other panels now in Washington from the same altarpiece. The hand of an assistant can be discerned in the Baptism of Clovis at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, who with have a panel with Episodes from the Life of a Bishop-Saint – perhaps Saint Leu, Saint Denis or Saint Remy. All four panels have, or had, single grisaille figures of saints (Saints Peter, Giles, Denis and an shadowy bishop-saint) in niches, imitating sculpture, on the reverse. The Washington pair, which were in destitute condition, have been on bad terms and are lost, although photographs exist. Undoubtedly there were supplementary panels, whose subjects cannot be guessed, as the concentration of scenes is original.

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