Bratsa Bonifacho: 19 interesting facts

By Gwylym Owen

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Bratsa Bonifacho (Braca Bonifacije; born February 10, 1937 in Yugoslavia) a painter, became a Canadian citizen in 1976 and now lives in Vancouver, Canada. Working from a discipline based in formalism, he is an abstract expressionist who chooses between many elements including symbolist and symbolic to express non-verbal thoughts and emotions abstractly.

Braca Bonifacije (born February 10, 1937 in Yugoslavia), artist, became a Canadian citizen in 1976 and now lives in Vancouver, Canada. Working in a discipline based on formalism, he was an abstract expressionist who chose from many elements, including symbolism and imagery, to abstract non-verbal thoughts and emotions.

Before settling in Vancouver, Canada in 1973 and becoming a Canadian citizen in 1976, he lived as an artist in France. He was part of the Belgrade Art Circle until 1973, when he moved to Vancouver, where he still lives and works. He made this fortune from his main career as an artist.

Bonifacio, who has participated in more than 50 exhibitions as an artist, left his native Belgrade and moved to Vancouver in 1973. Bratsa Bonifacio has been interested in abstracting thoughts and feelings using mesh compositions and letterforms in this new series of paintings. Based on the beauty and power of classical music. Given Bonifacio’s past, it’s easy to see that much of his work was influenced by his struggle to find meaning and understanding in a new language in the country he adopted.

The title of the exhibition is based on a group of paintings “Human Habitat Pixels” created by him in 2002. The Khazarian Dictionary is one of them, consisting of a grid of stencil capital letters on a bright red background. Like much of Habitat’s pixel art, one of his works, Metropolis Notturno, features letters, numbers, symbols, and signs arranged in a grid, painted in bright colors.

His brilliant canvases are full of emotion, feeling love with all the senses. His multi-layered abstract paintings are internationally renowned, and his strong interest in technology, communication and cultural identity is at the heart of his current artistic practice. Bonifachos Combustion Series (1988) expresses his “doomsday vision”, an abstract expression of the artist’s fears of nuclear catastrophe and environmental degradation.

In the late 1970s, Bonifacio exhibited his first paintings, a series of works inspired by pop art that conveyed artists’ frustrations with American propaganda during the Cold War. Bonifacioas’s first work, dated 1959-1963, was the politically motivated and highly emotional series Eyes over Belgrade. He used the roofs and outer surfaces of buildings as huge canvases on which he painted target-like pop designs that criticized the war and space race of the United States and Russia, infuriating his neighbors.

Landscapes played an important role in Bonifacio’s work as more than just landmarks for geography; Landscapes of Alberta, her first episode since immigration to Canada, not only played a local role, but also became a means of reconciliation with memories of war-torn landscapes, environmental destruction and longing for imaginary landscapes. Landscapes played an important role in Bonifacioas’ work as more than just landmarks for geography; Landscapes of Alberta, her first episode since immigration to Canada, not only played a local role, but also became a means of reconciliation with memories of war-torn landscapes, environmental destruction and longing for imaginary landscapes.

Bonifacio’s first paintings to receive critical acclaim in Canada were the Boards series, created between 1978 and 1982. This series features racing greyhounds, targets, pop culture symbols (for example, dreamy splashes of color dominate Darren Waterston’s paintings at Greg Kucher Gallery 2). linguistic interpretations of the Foster / White Gallery line of wall art this April.

Article Contents Painting inspired by language and computer viruses is one of Brats Bonifacio’s works on display at the Coquitlam Evergreen Cultural Center. Bonifacio joined Bau-Xi Gallery in 1998 and the Seattle-based Foster/White Gallery subsidiary in 2004. Originally, Bonifacio was expected to exhibit his work in the Windgate Art and Design Building, which opens to the public in September 2015, but a serious accident prevented that from happening.

He decided to submit eight works because he wanted his gift to impress. He added that he hoped his gift would encourage others to make similar gifts.

His work is represented by Bau-Xi Gallery in Toronto and Vancouver (Canada), Foster / White Gallery in Seattle (USA) and Masters Gallery in Calgary (Canada). His work is represented by Bau Xi Gallery in Toronto and Vancouver (Canada), Foster / White Gallery in Seattle (USA) and Herringer Kiss Gallery in Calgary (Canada). Before emigrating to Vancouver, Canada, his work was widely exhibited throughout Europe, and his work can still be found in collections in many places around the world.

Canadian-Yugoslavian artist Bratsa Bonifacio donated nine of her favorite paintings to Windgate Art & Design in 2016. Bratsa Bonifacio, an outstanding Canadian artist (Vancouver), donated 24 paintings to the National Museum of Kraljevo, created between 1988 and 2015. Bonifachos Inside Habitat Pixel runs until April 7 at the Art Gallery of the Evergreen Cultural Center in Coquitlam. Bonifacio’s paintings take the hype out of the digital world and diminish it.

Vancouver-based artist Brasta Bonifacio draws random block letters and enriches them with vibrant colors and intricate layouts. Bonifacio mimics the effects of computer viruses and worms by encrypting letters and messages in his large-scale oil paintings. It is easy to see how early linguistic paintings led Bonifacio to work with a different type of language: the language of computer viruses and worms.

They were first displayed publicly at a reception to mark the opening of the Ethiopia Awakening exhibition on 19 September. Before parting, the gallery performs with exhibits by local artists Anne Sims and Terry Turrell. The University of Arkansas – Fort Smith is Western Arkansas’ first regional institution linking education with careers and acting as an engine of economic development and quality in the large Fort Smith region.

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